Tag: writing

1/2 Price Tickets – Bootycandy – The Wilma Theater, It’s My Party: The Women and Comedy Project – 1812 Productions – Plays and Players

Philly Fun Savers offering 1/2 price tickets to Bootycandy and It’s My Party. I shall be attending Bootycandy on Wednesday and It’s My Party on Thursday, join me. 1/2 price tickets are being offered for other days as well. Full price tickets are available through the individual theaters.

The meetup Passports to Pleasure will be meeting in the lobby 1/2 hour before the show. This is a group that attends the Erotic Literary Salon monthly and offers a lot of other wonderful events. http://www.meetup.com/PassportToPleasure/events/115937462/

It’s My Party: The Women and Comedy Project

A world premiere comedy from “Philadelphia’s reigning comic queen.” (American Theatre Magazine)

It’s My Party: The Women and Comedy Project is the culmination of two years of research, a dozen workshops, and nearly a hundred interviews with women from all walks of life—exploring, and exposing, the role of comedy in women’s lives. This comedy extravaganza features seven of Philadelphia’s funniest actresses and a script by Jennifer Childs in a one-of-a-kind theatrical event. http://www.playsandplayers.org

Bootycandy

Behind a tall church pulpit, a fire-and-brimstone preacher delivers a shocking sermon to his congregation. On the tropical sands of a deserted island, two lesbians come together. And at the home of a young boy, Sutter, a mother scolds him for reading Jackie Collins romance novels. This is just a taste of playwright Robert O’Hara’s wildly imaginative anthology of sassy lessons in sex ed, a kaleidoscope of sketches that interconnect to portray growing up gay and African-American. With variety-show vivacity, outrageous humor, and real heart and soul, it tests how we talk about human desire and racial stereotypes at home, in church, and on the corner. Shantay! Sashay! https://wilmatheater.org

http://www.phillyfunguide.com/page/Funsavers_2013

Beverly Dale – Out of the Head, Into the Body, then Out of the Body into Ecstasy

This Sunday, 5/12/13 Dr. Reverend Beverly Dale, an attendee of the Erotic Literary Salon, will offer the sermon – Out of the Head, Into the Body, then Out of the Body into Ecstasy. Dr. Rev Bev Dale as she is affectionately, has a wonderful website with some great FREE videos. http://www.beverlydale.org/home/

Sometimes we think too much. This can easily get us into trouble both in the bedroom and on our faith journey. Thinking too much in the bedroom can become what is known as ‘spectatoring’,  the practice of watching intimacy rather than experiencing it. And, in our spiritual lives faith and religion simply get reduced to a list of things to believe and becomes a series of platitudes. (Yawn!) But, just as we can experience sexual ecstasy by getting out of our heads and into our bodies, this parallels the spiritual journey as well. We can be moved to experience the immeasurable greatness of God’s power and the unity of spirit that Jesus prayed for by shifting our attention in this same way. And in so doing it just might help us experience what the mystics have known through the centuries in all religions; ecstasy as a spiritual reality.

If this interests you, check out Rev Bev’s sermon at 10:00 a.m. at Tabernacle United Church, 3700 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, PA or watch their website for the audio recording. www.tabunited.org

 

Fat Sex: What Everyone Wants to Know but is Afraid to Ask

Excellent blog post written by a self proclaimed fat woman. Please read the comments, they really speak to the distorted self-image women have concerning their bodies.

Photograph by Victoria Janashvilli http://www.victoriajanashvili.com

Excerpt from Persephone Magazine:

I’m a fat woman. I’m a fat woman who has had lots and lots of awesome sex almost exclusively with partners much smaller than myself. When I met my current partner a year ago, I was at my fattest, about 150 lbs heavier than he is, making our sex the most drastic in terms of size difference relative to my past partners. Most women I know would not be comfortable with that size difference, and in candid moments, friends have asked, “So, how does that work?” The short answer? It works just great and I love it. There are many misconceptions about how fat people have sex, especially when one partner is fat and the other isn’t. I’m here to explore that topic, specifically the issue of being a fat woman having sex with a smaller partner.

I know many women who would love to have sex with smaller partners but feel that it wouldn’t work mechanically, that two drastically different bodies couldn’t come together in a pleasurable way. Additionally, many women who do have smaller partners tell me they don’t totally enjoy sex because they feel self-conscious, embarrassed, or unfulfilled because they can’t “let go” during sex. This brings me to what I feel is one of the most important parts of enjoying sex as a fat woman:

You’ll need to overcome the idea that your partner doesn’t know how fat you are. 

Your partner knows, and guess what? He or she wants to have sex with you. When I was a young chubbette, I remember trying to contort my body into more “flattering” positions while I was having sex, as if my partner didn’t notice my belly was getting paunchy. I’d arch my back, refuse to do positions that made me “feel fat,” and drape different parts of my body with a blanket or pillow to hide my increasingly chubby body. Sometimes that made me feel more at ease, but mostly it became tedious, distracted me from feeling sexy, and annoyed the crap out of my partner who just wanted to see his hot girlfriend naked. Once I became much larger than I’d been before, I simply refused to have the lights on during sex for the same reason — “He won’t know what my body looks like if I don’t show him.” Well, he totally knew how fat I was, and guess what? He still wanted to have sex with me, and what’s more, he loved having sex with me. It took me a long time to realize that my partners were having sex with me in part because of the way my body looks, not in spite of the way my body looks. It sounds simple, I know, but when you spend your whole life being told that fat bodies are not sexy, it takes some time to realize that sexiness isn’t that simple. This understanding is not something that happens overnight for most of us. Hell, it can take years. But, the sooner you learn (yes,learn) to feel sexy just the way you are, the sooner you’ll be able to enjoy your sexuality more fully. Really, this goes for men and women of all sizes, not just fat women. You owe it to yourself and your partner to trust that he or she really desires you and to do the best you can to keep that in mind when you find you have a hard time letting go and really being seen during sex. As a good friend of mine put it:

In our culture we have been taught to dread being able to pinch more than an inch and to be disgusted with our muffin tops. Even if we are thoroughly rad and feminist and above that sort of self-hating thinking, sometimes we don’t like what we see in the mirror, and sharing one’s body with another human being is an incredibly vulnerable act that can bring out our insecurities. But know this: the one place you should never, ever be ashamed of your body is during sex. That is the time to celebrate its capacity for giving and receiving pleasure. Instead of pulling away, enjoy it when your partner embraces your stomach or fondles it — soft voluptuous flesh can be a real turn-on. The way a woman’s form often holds its extra weight — around the belly, hips, thighs — is seen by many partners to be uniquely feminine and extremely erotic. The love handles you might hide under hoodies during the day should come out at night in all their glory.

You’re going to need a few things. First, get some big, firm pillows. Pillows are a fat girl’s best friend during sex. Next, find a firm, yet springy surface to do it on. Pillow top mattresses and memory foam tend to not be as easy to have sex on since you sink down into those surfaces instead of bouncing back. Next, get some decent water-based lubricant, just in case. I’ve heard a lot about fat women having “big vaginas,” which honestly doesn’t make any sense at all. The vagina is inside of the body. That would be like saying that fat women have bigger kidneys just because they’re fat. It’s nonsense. What’s far more likely is that you may just encounter the opposite — a fat woman’s vagina can be hard enter, especially if it’s not properly lubricated. Fat women can have more padding around the vagina (on their mons pubis and labia) than a thin woman, creating a potentially tricky situation. If your partner tries to enter your vagina when it’s not sufficiently lubricated or doesn’t take the time to part the labia, there can be resistance. If you’re lubricated well and take care to spread apart the fat surrounding the vagina, you should be good to go.

Not all sexual positions work for fat people and that’s okay. Many positions are challenging for everyone except gymnasts, so don’t feel like it’s just about you being too fat to do them. Most people have trouble with those positions. Personally, I have little to no interest in doing gravity-defying positions, so that’s not a problem, but I do miss being able to spoon-fuck (my ass is simply too large for any penis, no matter how gigantic, to find its way into my vagina in that position). More than any advice I can give you about where to put pillows, it’s going to take communication with your partner to find positions that work well for you. You’re going to need to talk about your fat, move it around, try out different positions, knowing and accepting ahead of time that it may not work out. A sense of humor is especially helpful when you’re trying out new things! You don’t need to be embarrassed, and hopefully, you have a loving, communicative partner who won’t make you feel that way. I believe that as long as your partner is GGG, the two of you will be able to experiment in a productive, positive way. If your partner won’t communicate about your sex life? Well, I think that’s a whole other article, but for the moment, I will give you permission to go ahead and stop having sex with that person until they are willing and able to make sex enjoyable for you.

Here is how I modify three standard sexual positions to make them Fat Sex friendly.

Read More:

http://persephonemagazine.com/2012/03/01/fat-sex-what-everyone-wants-to-know-but-is-afraid-to-ask/

 

 

Portraits of the Transgendered Community

The safe environment, comfort and support from the attendees at the Erotic Literary Salon offer people an opportunity to share their sexual memoirs in public.  Sexual identity, cross dressing and fetishes are just a few of the topics shared at the Salon.

Mariette Pathy Allen has taken photos of the transgendered community for over 35 years. The following are excerpts from an article by David Rosenberg.

Moving Portraits of the Transgendered Community Over 35 Years
By David Rosenberg
Posted Friday, May 3, 2013, at 11:05 AM
Slate.com
Kay, ex–Green Baret

Kay, ex–Green Beret Mariette Pathy Allen

Mariette Pathy Allen’s 35-year journey documenting the transgendered community had a serendipitous beginning.

In 1978, Allen and her husband went on a trip to New Orleans and happened to stay in the same inn as a group of cross-dressers. One morning after breakfast, the group began taking pictures by the swimming pool, and Allen, already with her camera equipment, gently asked if she could take a few shots as well.

“I lifted the camera to my eye looking at these people and one person standing opposite me looked back at me and I felt I was looking into a soul, not a man, not a woman, but the essence of a human being, and I thought, I have to have this person in my life,” Allen recalled.

That person, Vicki West, ended up living about 20 blocks from Allen in Manhattan and started introducing Allen to parties, friends, and conferences of people involved in the cross-dressing community.

“I found it beyond fascinating,” Allen said. “I discovered I had something I could contribute. When I started doing portraits of transgendered people, no one was doing it and I had to figure out what would be the most helpful way of doing it, what would be the meaning of it?”

Rachel, watching her father transform into Paula, Philadelphia

James at Fantasia Fair

Elayne with son, Ryan

Elayne with son, Ryan Mariette Pathy Allen

That meaning turned out to help “de-freakify” the community to outsiders and to help the people she photographed feel less stigmatized. While Allen initially began documenting people who considered themselves to be cross-dressers, her work, as well as the evolution of the trans community has expanded to those who identify as gender queer, gender fluid, intersex, and other terms under the umbrella of “transgendered”—“it’s a long alphabet,” Allen said with a laugh.

In 1990, Allen published her first book,Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them, a collection of images and interviews of what was then a taboo topic. Allen didn’t necessarily see the book as one that belonged to her, but she said she saw herself as a conduit for people who were aching to have their stories told, many of whom passed around copies, signing them as if it were a yearbook.

“It did a huge amount of good for the people themselves, and I’m still getting thanked years later,” Allen said. “It saved marriages; it was the book they showed their children or parents; it was their way of accessing their coming out. It may have helped people stay in this world. … It was very moving to me.”

Antonia alone at Christmas

Michelle and Betty Ann, Provincetown, Mass.

 When Allen was taking pictures during that time, many of her subjects didn’t know how to behave in front of the camera.

“I was often the first person who was positive and gave them permission and encouraged them [to be who they were],” Allen said.