Tag: rape

17 Facts About Sexual Violence and Sex Work-International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers-Dec 17

“Sex Workers Outreach Project Philadelphia [SWOP-PHILLY] is a grassroots organization – part of a national network – dedicated to improving the lives of sex workers – those with life experience in the sex trade – in Philadelphia Metro. We are here because we have been there, are there, and we care!”

http://swop-philly.com

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17 Facts About Sexual Violence and Sex Work

1.) Sex workers experience high levels of sexual violence. Globally, sex workers have a 45 to 75% chance of experiencing sexual violence at some point in their careers and a 32 to 55% chance of experiencing sexual violence in a given year.

2.) Sexual assault against individuals engaged sex work (especially criminalized forms of sex work) in the United States is also high. In Phoenix, AZ 37% of prostitution diversion program participants report being raped by a client, and 7.1% report being raped by a pimp. In Miami, FL, 34% of street-based sex workers reported violent encounters with clients in the past 90 days. In New York, 46% of indoor sex workers reported being forced to do something by a client that they did not want to do, and over 80% of street-based sex workers experienced violence.

3.) One in five police reports of sexual assault from an urban, U.S. emergency room were filed by sex workers. Sex workers were younger, poorer and suffered a greater number of injuries than other victims.

2015-12-04-1449246746-7397113-image.png4.) Lots of variation exists in sex worker vulnerability to violence.According to a systematic review of research on violence against sex workers, criminalization and policing, population movement and mobility, work environments, and broader economic conditions and gender inequality are correlated with increased violence against sex workers. In other studies, youthhomeless individuals, individuals who had previously been arrested for prostitutionmigrant sex workerssex workers who use drugs, and street-based sex workers were especially at risk of violence.

5.) Stigma increases violence. Various studies have noted a correlation between anti-sex work rhetoric that sees street-based workers as a nuisance or threat to public order and an increase in violence against workers.

6.) Sex workers frequently aren’t protected by rape shield laws. New Yorkand Ohio explicitly exclude prostitution to be used as character evidence against rape victims. Judges in states without explicit exclusion of sex work often allow for prostitution to be brought up.

2015-12-04-1449246942-4248642-image1.png7.) Sex workers are often ineligible for rape victim compensation funds or receive reduced amounts. In the United Kingdom, anyone with a minor conviction, including a conviction for public solicitation,is barred from receiving full rape victim compensation. In United States, sex worker survivors cannot receive compensation for lost wages from engaging in illegal forms of sex work. In ArkansasLouisianaMissouri,  Florida,and Ohio, individuals with felony convictions are not eligible for compensation at all while in others, such as Rhode Island, discretion is given to agency administering the victims assistance fund. Perhaps the largest barrier, many states deny or reduce awards for any actions which may have contributed to victimization, with most states categorically denying compensation if the assault happened to the victim while they were voluntarily engaging in illegal activity. For example, Indiana specifies that “a victim who was injured while committing, attempting to commit, participating in or attempting to participate in a criminal act” is ineligible for victims’ compensation.

8.) Judges, police and juries often hold bias against sex workers. In Philadelphia, Judge Teresa Carr-Deni called gang-rape of a sex worker at gunpoint “theft of services” and refused to allow prosecution to press aggravated sexual assault charges. In South Africa, police routinely refuse to even pursue rape cases involving sex workers or laugh at victims when victims come forward.

9.) Sometimes sex workers are arrested when they report violence, including trafficking to the police. This practice has been documented in the United States,  United Arab Emirates, and Central and Eastern Europe. Undocumented migrant workers can face deportation if they report crimes, and while visas exist for migrant trafficking victims, some countries, including Norway, regularly deport non-native victims of trafficking in the sex trade when they come forward for help.

2015-12-04-1449247068-9799384-image2.png10.) Sex worker rape victims rarely report victimization to the police. In Toronto, 100% of migrant sex workers interviewed by the Migrant Sex Workers Project said they would not call the police if they experienced violence. In Vancouver, Canada, only 25% of youth engaged in survival sex who had been sexually assaulted reported to the police. Of the youth who had been victimized, 18% did not receive help from anyone, including boyfriends, other sex workers, friends or parents. Sex workers express barriers to reporting sexual and other forms of violence to the police across the world – in Central and Eastern Europe, in AsiaAfrica, and South America.

11.) Sex Workers are especially vulnerable to police violence, as police officers can threaten victims with arrest or stage an arrest and sexually assault victims. In former Soviet Bloc countries, a high proportion of sex workers report being sexually assault by police–with rates as high as 90 percent in Kyrgyzstan. In Bangladesh, between 52% and 60% of street-based sex workers reported being raped by men in uniform. In South Africa, sex workers are routinely harassed, beaten, and assaulted. Police sexual violence against sex workers also exists in the United States: 17% of sex workers interviewed in a New York study reported sexual harassment and abuse, including rape, by police. In a Chicago study, 30% of erotic dancers and 24% of street-based sex workers who had been raped identified a police officer as the rapist. Approximately 20 % of other acts of sexual violence reported by study participants were committed by the police. In Bolivia, police regularly arrest sex workers and either extort money or force them to engage in coercive sex.

12.) Migrant sex workers, women (especially trans women) of color, drug users, and individuals with criminal records are especially vulnerable due to intersecting bias.2015-12-04-1449247223-8709422-aswa2.jpg In Norway, several migrant sex workers were evicted from their apartment and had their cash and electronics seized after reporting violent rape by individuals impersonating police. Migrant sex worker victims also face risk of being deported in Canada and the United States if they seek law enforcement help, and while relief from deportation for victims theoretically exists, it is inconsistently applied, high-barrier, quota-capped and temporary, and the process of applying for relief is labor-intensive, lengthy, and biased against imperfect victims. Trans women of color face disproportionateprofiling as sex workers and disproportionate police misconduct and sexual assault while in custody. And as a current, all-to-common example of how race, class, and criminalization of drug use and sex work intersect to make women vulnerable to state violence, Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw preyed on 13 black, low-income women, many with criminal records for prostitution and drug use, systematically using threat of arrest and the victims’ vulnerability due to race, class, and status as a sex worker or drug user to assault them.

13.) Criminalizing just clients increases violence against sex workers. Rape and sexual assault reports increased two-fold after Scotland introduced laws criminalizing solicitation in 2007. Generally, criminalization of clients can result indisplacement of street-based sex workers to more dangerous areas, make it more difficult for sex workers to access outreach services, result in sex workers working in isolation to avoid detection, and result in sex workers “rushing” conversations with clients to evade arrest, ultimately jeopardizing safety.

2015-12-04-1449247381-6398909-Aswa3.jpg14.) Rates of sexual and physical violence against sex workers are lowerin contexts where sex work is not criminalized. A recent academic article found that decriminalization is the only framework that would secure human rights for sex workers in South Africa. Across contexts, decriminalization allows sex workers to work together and for street-based sex workers to work in safer areas, factors which increase safety. Decriminalization also increases sex worker access to justice and allows sex workers to report violence to the police without fearing arrest. 70% of sex workers and social service providers in New Zealand say that sex workers were more likely to go to the police after sex work had been decriminalized.

15.) Sex work is not a form of sexual violence, but sex workers are especially vulnerable to sexual and intimate partner violence. Conflating sexual violence and sex work can increase violence against sex workers by perpetuating stigma, it can alienate sex workers from social services, and it can result in sex workers who are victims of violence being ignored.

16.) Sex workers sometimes also face structural violence from healthcare and social service professionals, but there are things agencies can to to help fight violence against sex workers. They can train staff to be culturally competent towards sex workers. They can organize bad date lists. They can support policies that increase sex worker access to justice, safety, and human rights. They can support or create space for peer-led efforts for safety and organizing.

17.) Sex workers – even the most vulnerable sex workers – are resilient, and in the face of individual and systematic violence, they support each other in staying safe and fighting back against violence. They organize bad date lists and share information about bad clients. They work together and look out for each other. They serve as safety buddies for each other. And they come together to support other sex workers who have experienced victimization. They conduct their own research. They teach service providers how to serve people in the sex trade without stigma. They educate each other about legal systems and their rights. Sex workers don’t need rescue or sympathy, they need solidarity in their fight for human rights.

2015-12-04-1449247480-5016044-ASWA4.jpg

All Images are from the African Sex Workers Alliance[ASWA] 16 Days of Activism Campaign. ASWA is the Pan African Alliance of sex worker led groups, and works strengthen the voices, empower, advocate for and advance the health and human rights of female, male, and transgender sex workers through networking, movement-building, and partnership development. The images are part of an online campaign of African sex workers, activists and human rights defenders showing solidarity to end violence against sex workers. Tied with this campaign is the build up to the December 17th International Day to End Violence against Sex Workers campaign marked globally to highlight injustices committed to sex workers. 

To learn more about the Aftican Sex Workers Alliance and their 16 Days of Activism campaign, visit the ASWA Website.

To learn more about violence against sex workers and Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, visit the December 17th Website.

1.) Sex workers experience high levels of sexual violence. Globally, sex workers have a 45 to 75% chance of experiencing sexual violence at some point in their careers and a 32 to 55% chance of experiencing sexual violence in a given year.

2.) Sexual assault against individuals engaged sex work (especially criminalized forms of sex work) in the United States is also high. In Phoenix, AZ 37% of prostitution diversion program participants report being raped by a client, and 7.1% report being raped by a pimp. In Miami, FL, 34% of street-based sex workers reported violent encounters with clients in the past 90 days. In New York, 46% of indoor sex workers reported being forced to do something by a client that they did not want to do, and over 80% of street-based sex workers experienced violence.

3.) One in five police reports of sexual assault from an urban, U.S. emergency room were filed by sex workers. Sex workers were younger, poorer and suffered a greater number of injuries than other victims.

2015-12-04-1449246746-7397113-image.png4.) Lots of variation exists in sex worker vulnerability to violence.According to a systematic review of research on violence against sex workers, criminalization and policing, population movement and mobility, work environments, and broader economic conditions and gender inequality are correlated with increased violence against sex workers. In other studies, youthhomeless individuals, individuals who had previously been arrested for prostitutionmigrant sex workerssex workers who use drugs, and street-based sex workers were especially at risk of violence.

5.) Stigma increases violence. Various studies have noted a correlation between anti-sex work rhetoric that sees street-based workers as a nuisance or threat to public order and an increase in violence against workers.

6.) Sex workers frequently aren’t protected by rape shield laws. New Yorkand Ohio explicitly exclude prostitution to be used as character evidence against rape victims. Judges in states without explicit exclusion of sex work often allow for prostitution to be brought up.

2015-12-04-1449246942-4248642-image1.png7.) Sex workers are often ineligible for rape victim compensation funds or receive reduced amounts. In the United Kingdom, anyone with a minor conviction, including a conviction for public solicitation,is barred from receiving full rape victim compensation. In United States, sex worker survivors cannot receive compensation for lost wages from engaging in illegal forms of sex work. In ArkansasLouisianaMissouri,  Florida,and Ohio, individuals with felony convictions are not eligible for compensation at all while in others, such as Rhode Island, discretion is given to agency administering the victims assistance fund. Perhaps the largest barrier, many states deny or reduce awards for any actions which may have contributed to victimization, with most states categorically denying compensation if the assault happened to the victim while they were voluntarily engaging in illegal activity. For example, Indiana specifies that “a victim who was injured while committing, attempting to commit, participating in or attempting to participate in a criminal act” is ineligible for victims’ compensation.

8.) Judges, police and juries often hold bias against sex workers. In Philadelphia, Judge Teresa Carr-Deni called gang-rape of a sex worker at gunpoint “theft of services” and refused to allow prosecution to press aggravated sexual assault charges. In South Africa, police routinely refuse to even pursue rape cases involving sex workers or laugh at victims when victims come forward.

9.) Sometimes sex workers are arrested when they report violence, including trafficking to the police. This practice has been documented in the United States,  United Arab Emirates, and Central and Eastern Europe. Undocumented migrant workers can face deportation if they report crimes, and while visas exist for migrant trafficking victims, some countries, including Norway, regularly deport non-native victims of trafficking in the sex trade when they come forward for help.

2015-12-04-1449247068-9799384-image2.png10.) Sex worker rape victims rarely report victimization to the police. In Toronto, 100% of migrant sex workers interviewed by the Migrant Sex Workers Project said they would not call the police if they experienced violence. In Vancouver, Canada, only 25% of youth engaged in survival sex who had been sexually assaulted reported to the police. Of the youth who had been victimized, 18% did not receive help from anyone, including boyfriends, other sex workers, friends or parents. Sex workers express barriers to reporting sexual and other forms of violence to the police across the world – in Central and Eastern Europe, in AsiaAfrica, and South America.

11.) Sex Workers are especially vulnerable to police violence, as police officers can threaten victims with arrest or stage an arrest and sexually assault victims. In former Soviet Bloc countries, a high proportion of sex workers report being sexually assault by police–with rates as high as 90 percent in Kyrgyzstan. In Bangladesh, between 52% and 60% of street-based sex workers reported being raped by men in uniform. In South Africa, sex workers are routinely harassed, beaten, and assaulted. Police sexual violence against sex workers also exists in the United States: 17% of sex workers interviewed in a New York study reported sexual harassment and abuse, including rape, by police. In a Chicago study, 30% of erotic dancers and 24% of street-based sex workers who had been raped identified a police officer as the rapist. Approximately 20 % of other acts of sexual violence reported by study participants were committed by the police. In Bolivia, police regularly arrest sex workers and either extort money or force them to engage in coercive sex.

12.) Migrant sex workers, women (especially trans women) of color, drug users, and individuals with criminal records are especially vulnerable due to intersecting bias.2015-12-04-1449247223-8709422-aswa2.jpg In Norway, several migrant sex workers were evicted from their apartment and had their cash and electronics seized after reporting violent rape by individuals impersonating police. Migrant sex worker victims also face risk of being deported in Canada and the United States if they seek law enforcement help, and while relief from deportation for victims theoretically exists, it is inconsistently applied, high-barrier, quota-capped and temporary, and the process of applying for relief is labor-intensive, lengthy, and biased against imperfect victims. Trans women of color face disproportionateprofiling as sex workers and disproportionate police misconduct and sexual assault while in custody. And as a current, all-to-common example of how race, class, and criminalization of drug use and sex work intersect to make women vulnerable to state violence, Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw preyed on 13 black, low-income women, many with criminal records for prostitution and drug use, systematically using threat of arrest and the victims’ vulnerability due to race, class, and status as a sex worker or drug user to assault them.

13.) Criminalizing just clients increases violence against sex workers. Rape and sexual assault reports increased two-fold after Scotland introduced laws criminalizing solicitation in 2007. Generally, criminalization of clients can result indisplacement of street-based sex workers to more dangerous areas, make it more difficult for sex workers to access outreach services, result in sex workers working in isolation to avoid detection, and result in sex workers “rushing” conversations with clients to evade arrest, ultimately jeopardizing safety.

2015-12-04-1449247381-6398909-Aswa3.jpg14.) Rates of sexual and physical violence against sex workers are lowerin contexts where sex work is not criminalized. A recent academic article found that decriminalization is the only framework that would secure human rights for sex workers in South Africa. Across contexts, decriminalization allows sex workers to work together and for street-based sex workers to work in safer areas, factors which increase safety. Decriminalization also increases sex worker access to justice and allows sex workers to report violence to the police without fearing arrest. 70% of sex workers and social service providers in New Zealand say that sex workers were more likely to go to the police after sex work had been decriminalized.

15.) Sex work is not a form of sexual violence, but sex workers are especially vulnerable to sexual and intimate partner violence. Conflating sexual violence and sex work can increase violence against sex workers by perpetuating stigma, it can alienate sex workers from social services, and it can result in sex workers who are victims of violence being ignored.

16.) Sex workers sometimes also face structural violence from healthcare and social service professionals, but there are things agencies can to to help fight violence against sex workers. They can train staff to be culturally competent towards sex workers. They can organize bad date lists. They can support policies that increase sex worker access to justice, safety, and human rights. They can support or create space for peer-led efforts for safety and organizing.

17.) Sex workers – even the most vulnerable sex workers – are resilient, and in the face of individual and systematic violence, they support each other in staying safe and fighting back against violence. They organize bad date lists and share information about bad clients. They work together and look out for each other. They serve as safety buddies for each other. And they come together to support other sex workers who have experienced victimization. They conduct their own research. They teach service providers how to serve people in the sex trade without stigma. They educate each other about legal systems and their rights. Sex workers don’t need rescue or sympathy, they need solidarity in their fight for human rights.

2015-12-04-1449247480-5016044-ASWA4.jpg

All Images are from the African Sex Workers Alliance[ASWA] 16 Days of Activism Campaign. ASWA is the Pan African Alliance of sex worker led groups, and works strengthen the voices, empower, advocate for and advance the health and human rights of female, male, and transgender sex workers through networking, movement-building, and partnership development. The images are part of an online campaign of African sex workers, activists and human rights defenders showing solidarity to end violence against sex workers. Tied with this campaign is the build up to the December 17th International Day to End Violence against Sex Workers campaign marked globally to highlight injustices committed to sex workers. 

To learn more about the Aftican Sex Workers Alliance and their 16 Days of Activism campaign, visit the ASWA Website.

To learn more about violence against sex workers and Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, visit the December 17th Website.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/katherine-koster/16-facts-about-sexual-ass_b_8711720.html

What Happens After Men Get Raped in America

Important issue rarely spoken about.

distress-1

 By Jack Fischl  

It’s highly likely that you know a man who has endured sexual violence. But you probably don’t know it yet, and might never know.

One in 6 American men will encounter sexual abuse at some point in their lives. According toMaleSurvivor, a nonprofit that helps male survivors of sexual assault heal, after a man is raped, he doesn’t tell anyone for, on average, 20 years. When he finally does, his courage is often met with derision, confusion, dismissal and even disbelief.

That makes it all the more important for people to understand how they can support of male survivors, if and when they decide to share their story.

When men share their stories of enduring sexual violence and rape, they are likely to hear remarks such as, “That can’t happen to a man.” These reactions, often rooted in ignorance rather than malice, contribute to doubt, shame, revictimization and depression. They often impede the survivor from seeking the much-needed professional help integral to the healing process.

In order to truly understand how to be supportive, one should search no further than the voices of men who’ve endured such painful, dehumanizing experiences.

Mic spoke with male survivors of sexual assault to solicit their recommendations for how friends and family members of victims can be supportive allies in the healing process. Their stories are multidimensional. They include assaults perpetrated by people from all walks of life, including men, women, strangers, family members, priests, friends and teachers. Some were assaulted as children, others as adults. They are sharing their stories in order to create a more compassionate and understanding climate for male survivors of sexual violence.

Image Credit: Associated Press

Believing without blaming.

It’s crucial to recognize that many of the things commonly said to male sexual assault survivors are things that we should probably never say.

Charlie, 66, from Boston, said victim blaming, accidental or otherwise, commonly crops up for male survivors.

“Were you drunk? Were you on drugs? Were you flirting with her the night before?” are some of the irrelevant questions that may shift the accountability away from the perpetrator. Expressing disbelief may be an act of sympathy, but this common reaction makes disclosure particularly difficult for survivors. It can even belittle what they’ve experienced.

Jeff, 51, from Indiana, told Mic via email that some people have refused to believe what happened and respond with a blunt: “No you weren’t.” Jeff was told that the priest who sexually assaulted him “would never do that. He’s a good man, and a priest too.”

In some cases, the perpetrator is not someone who you would expect. It could even be someone you respect, which could make it difficult to listen to the survivor’s account of what happened.

Don’t question the victim’s sexuality.

Some men get questions about their sexuality. Gregg, 50, from Michigan, said he’s been asked about his sexual orientation, asked whether the perpetrator was a woman or a man and if his experience with sexual violence makes him attracted to both sexes. These questions are all irrelevant. A man’s sexual orientation does not invite assault, nor does the assault alter his sexual orientation.

And for the men who were assaulted by women, some of them are told that they should be grateful.Jarrod, 47, is a survivor from Oklahoma. While he was not himself assaulted by a woman, he has worked with a variety of sexual assault victims, and says guys often respond, “Man, I wish that I had an older woman to teach me about sex when I was that age.” But the “hot for teacher” trope, entrenched in pop culture through references as Van Halen’s hit “Hot for Teacher,” inaccurately regards the incident as “sex” when it indeed was rape, ignoring the emotional trauma that often results from an adult woman taking advantage of an adolescent male.

Throw out stereotypes.

Perhaps one of the most troubling reactions, especially within broader conversations about a culture that often falters on issues of sexual violence, is when some survivors are told that men can’t be raped, or that sexual assault is a “woman’s issue.”

Chris Anderson, executive director for MaleSurvivor, told Mic via email that many responses to his story of survival have included statements like “Stop trying to make this about you,” and “A real man would have defended himself.” But these reactions only work to ensure that rape of men remains a silent epidemic, preventing many survivors from being comfortable enough to disclose what happened to them.

While many common reactions to male sexual assault survivors seem like appropriate responses to a devastating revelation, many of them are, instead, counterproductive.

Let him tell you his way.

Byron, 56, from Florida, said that just because he’s comfortable telling that story does not mean he’s comfortable answering a lot of questions about it.

“I’m comfortable telling people what I’m prepared to disclose, but not to relive the details of the experience,” he said. When the person is ready to tell you, Byron said, the details will emerge.

Even prematurely affixing labels to men who share their stories isn’t the best idea, according to some survivors.

Peter Pollard, director of communications and professional relations for 1in6, an organization supporting male sexual violence survivors, said via email that it’s important to avoid labels, even if they seem validating.

“Many men may not be ready to identify as a ‘victim,’ a ‘survivor,’ or someone who has experienced trauma,” Pollard said, adding that it’s best to let the person define their experience and their story in the way that they feel most comfortable.

Emphasizing active listening and empathy.

Even though it’s important to allow survivors to tell their experience in a way that works best for them, hearing it can put the listener in a potentially powerful position to help them on the path to recovery.

“Believing someone validates the pain they are carrying, and lets them know they are not alone,” Anderson said, a sentiment echoed by other survivors who spoke with Mic.

Through active listening, survivors are positioned to feel the compassion and empathy that they desire and very much need from supportive friends and family members.

Ed, 38, from North Carolina, said one of the most positive responses he ever heard was simply, “I can’t understand what you are going through, because I never have, but I will be there and support you as you go through.” But, to be clear, another survivor added that even if you actually have experienced something similar, everybody’s story is different and it’s impossible to understand exactly what the survivor went through.

While actively listening and being compassionate is an exercise of empathy, it’s helpful to provide survivors with the resources and information to seek professional help. No one should force a survivor to seek treatment, however, as everyone’s pathway to recovery is unique and should be tailored to their individual needs.

So if a male survivor approaches you with their story, listen to him. Don’t grill him, don’t blame him and definitely don’t berate him. Offer your support only if you are genuinely prepared to be an active part of what will be a difficult, uphill healing process.

Hopefully, with the care and understanding of people in their support system, he will come to recognize that what happened to him was not his fault, that he’s not alone and that there is hope for recovery.

If you or someone you know is a survivor of sexual assault and is male-identified, below are resources for referral.

Read more:

http://mic.com/articles/93870/what-happens-after-men-get-raped-in-america

 

Philly’s “Swiss Cheese Pervert” Could be Dangerous

The Daily News published this article yesterday, most important to read and act on it if you see someone matching his description. I attended the same grad school as Gloria Brame, the expert consulted for article, so I know she is extremely sex positive. IASHS is  probably the only school that would allow her to research her passion and write a dissertation on ‘kink and fetishes.’

BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916

POSTED: January 13, 2014

SWISS CHEESE, STINKY feet, chocolate pudding: There’s no telling what gets someone’s blood pumping below the belt.

But one expert says that when a sexual fetish becomes an obsession – when it literally gets exposed to the public as it has for Philadelphia’s “Swiss Cheese Pervert” – the combo of fromage and adrenaline can be an unsavory mix.

“Yeah, it’s pretty weird, but with food, who knows. It’s surprising, but it isn’t shocking,” said Gloria Brame, a certified clinical sexologist from Georgia who wrote her dissertation on “kink and fetishes.”

“It’s not about the cheese, though. It’s the criminality of it that’s worrisome.”

On Saturday, Philadelphia magazine published the name and photo of a 41-year-old Norristown man who matches the description of a man who’s been seen recently holding a slice of Swiss over his penis inside a car around Mayfair. The man identified by the magazine, along with several of his relatives, could not be reached for comment yesterday, and his Facebook page appeared to have been deleted.

The Philadelphia Police Department’s Special Victims Unit said it was aware of the magazine report yesterday, but the investigators handling the case would not be back in until this morning.

The “Swiss Cheese Pervert,” expert Brame said, is “definitely somebody the cops to need to find” because he needs more than cheese and a willing partner to feel satisfied.

“If this guy really wanted to, there’s no hooker in the world who would turn down $50 to [pleasure a guy] with Swiss cheese,” she said.

The man identified by Philadelphia magazine has been charged with soliciting prostitution on two occasions.

Long before women reported a man dangling slices of Swiss over his groin here in Philadelphia, a man with a Swiss-cheese fetish was freaking people out on dating sites such as…read more.

http://articles.philly.com/2014-01-13/news/46153142_1_philadelphia-magazine-fetish-man

Sexy beasts: Why ‘monster porn’ needs love too – CNET

“Why deprive the imagination of a great romance just because the protagonist happens to live for 600 years or has the occasional bout with fleas?”

Leda and the Swan by Peter Paul Rubens

Excellent article in CNET regarding the epublishing industry’s controversial handling of beastiality and erotica.

“Do romance books with sexy dinosaurs, centaurs, Cthulhu, and aliens send your heart racing? After some such e-books get yanked by online booksellers, Crave’s Bonnie Burton explains their appeal.

“It’s easy to mock book titles like “Boffing Bigfoot,” “Taken by the Tentacle Monsters,” and “Sex With My Husband’s Anatomically Correct Robot,” but there’s a growing market for erotic fiction by amateur writers that involves something a bit more unusual than an oversexed pirate or kilted warrior.

If romance e-books with sexy Yeti, mermen, Cthulhu, and aliens fill your tablet or e-reader and send your heart racing, the increasingly popularity of books featuring non-human love interests will come as no surprise. However, many may have been introduced to so-called monster porn for the first time thanks to a recent Business Insider piece on e-book retailers cracking down on this literary genre that’s gaining a wide following online. One of the titles in question, “Moan For Bigfoot” by Virginia Wade, has been downloaded more than 100,000 times.

As a lifelong geek and hard-core fan of horror and fantasy books, I totally get the appeal. Let’s face it — an affair with a rich sultan or a fascinating count probably isn’t going to happen in real life, so why not read about a flirty fling with a centaur instead?

Aliens dominate this erotic thriller by Alice Xavier about an abductee that might enjoy probing too much. Aliens dominate this erotic thriller by Alice Xavier.

The Business Insider story by Eric Spitznagel points out that amateur self-published authors suddenly found their erotica e-books featuring Bigfoot, dinosaurs, and minotaurs no longer offered by sellers like Amazon because of their explicit sexual content. At the same time, erotica books by more established authors that featured vampires, werewolves, aliens, and other similar creatures remained untouched.

Many of the removed erotica e-books were published through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing self-publishing system, which clearly states in its content guidelines that “we don’t accept pornography or offensive depictions of graphic sexual acts.” A representative of KindleDirect Publishing told CNET that the KDP’s quality department “reserves the right to make judgements about whether or not content is appropriate; this can include the cover image or the content within the book. If the book contains mature content, it will not be surfaced in our general product search results.”

Some authors of recently rejected e-books realized that the quick solution to getting their titles back up on Amazon was not to alter their racy content but simply to change their e-books’ titles and cover art. That’s exactly what monster erotica author Alice Xavier did with her “Serpent God’s Virgin” e-book when it was pulled from Amazon. “They flagged it because it had virgin in the title,” Xavier told Business Insider. After she renamed the same exact book “Serpent God’s Maiden,” it appeared back on Amazon’s virtual bookshelves.

The disappearance and reemergence of some of these books points to online booksellers’ evolving standards when it comes to monster erotica. That is a story unto itself, but for some readers, the Business Insider piece probably also raised the question: what makes monster porn — also known as “cryptozoological erotica” or “erotic horror” — so intoxicating?”

Read more:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57616285-1/sexy-beasts-why-monster-porn-needs-love-too/