Tag: literature

List of Great Erotica Reads Plus Videos – Women Orgasm While Reading

A listing of some books people mentioned at the last Salon, in response to an Adult Sex-Ed Question: “What are some really good erotica readings?” Presumably to get turned on while reading. Before you read the list (below this article) you might be interested in several short videos of women getting turning on while reading, but not by the words – a hidden vibrator. Fun to watch nonetheless.

Women Orgasm While Reading… For The Sake Of Art, Of Course (NSFW)

In the videos below, a series of women sit at a desk and read a book of their choosing aloud. As their reading session continues, you may notice a quickness of breath, some fumbling over easily legible words, light panting, shivering, giggling and moaning.

No, these physical reactions aren’t responses to the texts themselves, but rather to an unseen assistant pleasuring said women with vibrators under the table. Eventually, they climax. The piece, by artist Clayton Cubitt, is titled “Hysterical Literature,” and is slated to go on view as part of Mass MoCA’s “Bibliothecaphilia“ exhibition later this month.

I sat the readers at a table,” Cubitt told The Daily Beast, “and I showed what society wants to see on top of the table, and I hid the sex under the table. I wanted to see what people would react to more: what they could see, or what they imagined.”

“Bibliothecaphilia” addresses the quiet, mystical allure of the library — a space of escape, of solitude, of transcendence. With the rise of eBooks and library apps, these strange sacred spaces sometimes teeter on becoming obsolete. The group show features artists who unpack our appetites for libraries in all their physical and mythical glory.

While Cubitt’s video series certainly touches on the love of libraries, it simultaneously explores themes of feminism, sexuality, hysteria and authenticity. The moving portraits, shot in stark black-and-white, are part fine art, part viral click-bait, part literary ode, part pornography.

I’m quite fascinated with the concepts of control and release when it comes to portraiture, especially in this modern of era of social networking profile self-portraits and Instagram, when everyone has a well-practiced notion of personal branding,“ Cubitt explained to The Daily Dot. “What’s left for the portraitist to capture? One can shock the sitter out of that plastic smile. I’m attempting to lead them back to something real.”

Despite the obvious erotic appeal of Cubitt’s project, the importance extends beyond just sex. For many of the female participants, the session presented an opportunity for women to proudly express their sexualities and retain their power — a man is never pictured on screen. “This is my revolutionary act of selfishness,” wrote one participant of her experience, “my virtual picket sign… my one-woman rally… my rebel yell… my sedentary march… a call for dialogue and understanding.”

Other participants commented on the biased and frustrating response to the piece, which unapologetically displayed the taboo image of female pleasure. “But despite being a project I’m deeply proud of, it has been challenging to deal with the intense scrutiny by the art world for my participation in this work, while my male counterpart rarely dealt with any,” said photographer and artist Marne Lucas, who appears in session nine.

The series title, “Hysterical Literature,” alludes to Victorian-era treatments for female “hysteria,” which often incorporated vibrating patients. It also evokes associations to the religious ecstasies of the middle ages, as the subjects’ spoken words are imbued with erotic ecstasy.

The films, at once intellectually and sexually stimulating, juxtapose the cultured pursuit of reading with the more deviant pastime of masturbation. “I don’t remember exactly when I decided to combine this with reading.“ Cubitt explained, “At some point it occurred to me that the choice of books is such a personal one, that it could serve as a proxy for our idealized personality, while the physical distraction could try to destroy it. And that also allowed me to poke fun at the idea that our mind is somehow ‘better’ or more ‘us’ than our body. How nobly we view the act of reading, compared to the act of sex.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/15/clayton-cubitt_n_6472188.html

At last Tuesday’s Salon April 19, I mentioned this woodcut. s

Katsushika Hokusai’s “The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife”

EROTICA BOOK LISTING

Jon sent the following email:

“The authors I mentioned the other night were Emma Holly and Cecilia Tan. I may have mentioned a few others but I can’t remember offhand.

Holly writes erotic romances, often delving into paranormal erotica and BDSM. Some of her works are more toward mainstream romance, but when she turns toward *erotic* erotica she writes some of the best sex scenes I’ve ever seen in print. I recommend All U Can Eatand Cooking Up A Storm– both contemporary erotica standalone books. Her website is http://emmaholly.com/

Cecilia Tan is one of my personal heroes. Not only does she fuse sci-fi/fantasy/speculative fiction with erotica, often with BDSM & LGBTQ themes, she also founded Circlet Press (“Erotica for Geeks”, http://circlet.com/) which is devoted to publishing that genre. Her short story collection Black Feathersis a good starting point, or her novel The Velderet. Her personal website is http://ceciliatan.com/.

I also mentioned BookBub (http://bookbub.com/), which collects discounted and free ebook offers. I subscribe to their daily newsletter, which nearly always includes at least one erotica title (too often along the lines of the dreaded “Sexy Billionaire” trope) and often has free titles. There are similar services out there but so far BookBub is the only one I know of that includes erotica.

Who else? Janine Ashbless (http://www.janineashbless.com/), Rose Caraway’s The Sexy Librarian’s Big Book of Erotica, (S&S’s Cleis Press imprint, http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Sexy-Librarians-Big-Book-of-Erotica/Rose-Caraway/9781627780773), and a big shout out to anything by Logan Belle (the author, not to be confused with the singer-songwriter: http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Logan-Belle/406674085).

That’s all I’ve got for now.” – Thank you Jon

 

I would like to add: Violet Blue, an erotica author and editor. Her website https://www.tinynibbles.com has a great blog and links to her work at Literate Smut on her menu bar.

 

 

TONIGHT-Tuesday-Oct 17-The Erotic Literary Salon/Adult Sex Ed

Program for tonight:

  • Adult Sex Ed
  • Jon Drucker’s Book Release Party
  • Memorial readings for Frances Seidman-First reader at the Salon in May 2008
  • Information regarding the Erotic Literary Salon readings at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in a few weeks.
  • Do come and read (sign-up at the door) or just come to listen. If you would like to participate but don’t write, you can read from the Craig’s list personals I hand-out.
  • Doors open 6:30 – see you tonight.

I enjoy sensual pictures of people and sharing them with the Salon.

Reminder-June 20-Book Release Party & Article “When Should Parents Talk To Kids About Porn?”

Next Tuesday, Jun 20 celebration, newly released book Madam Jillinghoff’s Bedroom Rhymes, recently published by West Philly Press. Master of verse parody Joe B. will present selections from his book. Joe has been entertaining guests of the salon with his verse parodies since November 2013, when he stepped up to the microphone for the first time and recited “The Lay of Mary Dawkins.” Two copies of Madam Jillinghoff will also be given away to lucky ticket holders.

Dr. Marty Klein: Changing the Way People, Politics & the Media Look at Sex

When Should Parents Talk To Kids About Porn?

When Should Parents Talk To Kids About Porn? That’s the question an interviewer asked me today.

The answer is: now. Especially if you haven’t talked to your kids about porn lately. Just like a single conversation isn’t enough to cover everything a kid needs to know about nutrition or bike safety as he or she grows, it isn’t enough to cover the subject of porn. Or the even more complex subject of sexuality.

Here are some key points of the interview.

* There is no “The Sex Talk” with kids. Rather, there’s a conversation that lasts 15 or 20 years—or longer, if you’re fortunate enough to have a relationship with your young adult kids.

* You don’t want porn to be the topic of the first talk you have with your kids about sex. Therefore, go talk with them about sex now, preparing the vocabulary and concepts for upcoming conversations about porn.

* Porn is part of the larger, long-term series of conversations about sex we have with our kids. Those talks involve how bodies work, what to expect from puberty, how to tell someone you like them, how to make good decisions (and how alcohol makes that difficult), why different people have sex, what to do if you feel pressured, and more.

* Porn isn’t made for kids, and we don’t want them watching it. Nevertheless, they need preparation for the watching that they’re going to do, whether it’s intentional or not. This is NOT a double message: we want them to bike safely, but require they wear a helmet; we want them to drive safely, but require them to wear a seat belt.

* When we talk to kids about porn, here are some subjects we need to cover:
~ Porn isn’t made for you;
~ Real sex doesn’t feel like porn looks;
~ Porn involves unusual bodies in unusual circumstances doing unusual things;
~ Adults sometimes play sex games that can be confusing for a kid to understand;
~ There’s a lot of preparation off-camera that we don’t see—the script, the planning, the use of products like lube and Viagra and contraception;
~ While many adults are OK about porn (for other adults), some adults totally object to anyone watching it;
~ You might think sexting is harmless, but it is really, really against the law, and if you do it you can really, really get in trouble with the police. If you get a sexy picture you didn’t ask for, please come and see me—I promise I won’t punish you.

* If you’re embarrassed to talk to your kids about sex or porn, say “I’m embarrassed.” Then talk anyway.

For more about enhancing porn literacy in young people (and reducing marital conflict about porn), see my new book or blog.

Reminder-Tuesday Jan 17-The Erotic Literary Salon-Live, Between The Sheets-Writing & Selling Erotica w/Rachel Kramer Bussel

Come prepared to ask your anonymous sex and sexuality questions. Adult Sex-Ed is all about the attendees’ and sexologist Susana Mayer answering your questions.

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Between The Sheets a writing and selling erotica class with the famous editor and writer Rachel Kramer Bussel. Class begins February 7, online.

Rachel has read her erotica at the Erotic Literary Salon several years ago. She is definitely a person who teaches what she practices and has a most successful erotica writing and editing career.

Class Description

Let’s talk about sex.

Specifically, writing about it.

First, it ain’t easy to write. Sex itself can be awkward enough, but describing it? Without sounding like a goofball? That can be tough.

Second, there’s this whole big genre totally devoted to sex called erotica, which has turned into a dirty word among writers—especially those who think Fifty Shades of Grey is all it has to offer.

But you can write sex with a deft hand, with skill and grace, in a way that reveals character and emotion. And you’ll learn to do that in Between the Sheets with Rachel Kramer Bussel.

Rachel has been writing erotica for over 15 years, and has edited over 50 anthologies, including Hungry for More, The Big Book of Orgasms, Fast Girls, and Cheeky Spanking Stories, and is Best Bondage Erotica series editor. Her short stories have been published in over 100 anthologies, including the Best American Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica, Best Gay Erotica and Best Lesbian Erotica series. For five years she ran the In The Flesh Erotic Reading Series, and has conducted readings and taught erotic writing workshops across the country.

As part of the class, you’ll receive a bibliography and market listing, and you’ll be pointed to current markets that are looking for new writing.

What This Class Covers

Week One: Erotica is Everywhere

We will define erotica and its purpose, including examples from literary fiction and erotic novels, including varying types of language and the mechanics of writing about sex, including research (no, you absolutely don’t have to have done the things you’re writing about). We’ll discuss language, voice, pace, and how to find the erotic potential in everyday situations, as well as how to overcome internal hurdles to writing erotica and answer your friends’ and families’ nosy questions.

Assignment: Students will be asked to write a prompt-driven erotic scene with particular attention to fresh imagery and avoidance of cliche.

Week Two: From Humor to Heartache: Setting the Mood

Erotica is not necessarily about shiny happy people having the best orgasms of their lives on every page (though you will find plenty of happy people enjoying their sexuality). Erotica may or may not have a traditional happy ending (pun intended). We’ll examine why humor and heartache work in erotica and how they can be used to your best advantage to add to the tension and draw of a story.

Assignment: Students will respond to story prompts incorporating humor and heartache respectively using the same set of characters.

Week Three: Motivation

Why is erotica about more than just a sex scene? How can you enhance the sex scenes in your stories by adding conflict, backstory and motivation? How does writing about characters fundamentally different from you push you to explore the genre, and what does it teach you about sexuality? We’ll explore different motivations within erotica and how they fuel the story.

Assignment: Students will explore point of view and voice in erotica by telling the same story from multiple viewpoints, and examining which voice speaks the most strongly.

Week Four: The Business of Erotica and Submitting Your Work

What are editors looking for in today’s erotica marketplace, and how can you stand out? Should you use a pseudonym? How can you extend your work beyond a single story? How much money can you expect to make from writing erotica?

Assignment: Complete a short story and submit it to a current market.

Goals Of This Class

  • Learn what erotica is (and isn’t)—and about the marketplace for erotica and erotic fiction
  • Write from various points of view, sexualities, and character types
  • Incorporate elements of pop culture, news, and everyday life into your erotica
  • Craft a complete erotic short story and submit it