Tag: erotica

Reminder-Tuesday Jan 17-The Erotic Literary Salon-Live, Between The Sheets-Writing & Selling Erotica w/Rachel Kramer Bussel

Come prepared to ask your anonymous sex and sexuality questions. Adult Sex-Ed is all about the attendees’ and sexologist Susana Mayer answering your questions.

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Between The Sheets a writing and selling erotica class with the famous editor and writer Rachel Kramer Bussel. Class begins February 7, online.

Rachel has read her erotica at the Erotic Literary Salon several years ago. She is definitely a person who teaches what she practices and has a most successful erotica writing and editing career.

Class Description

Let’s talk about sex.

Specifically, writing about it.

First, it ain’t easy to write. Sex itself can be awkward enough, but describing it? Without sounding like a goofball? That can be tough.

Second, there’s this whole big genre totally devoted to sex called erotica, which has turned into a dirty word among writers—especially those who think Fifty Shades of Grey is all it has to offer.

But you can write sex with a deft hand, with skill and grace, in a way that reveals character and emotion. And you’ll learn to do that in Between the Sheets with Rachel Kramer Bussel.

Rachel has been writing erotica for over 15 years, and has edited over 50 anthologies, including Hungry for More, The Big Book of Orgasms, Fast Girls, and Cheeky Spanking Stories, and is Best Bondage Erotica series editor. Her short stories have been published in over 100 anthologies, including the Best American Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica, Best Gay Erotica and Best Lesbian Erotica series. For five years she ran the In The Flesh Erotic Reading Series, and has conducted readings and taught erotic writing workshops across the country.

As part of the class, you’ll receive a bibliography and market listing, and you’ll be pointed to current markets that are looking for new writing.

What This Class Covers

Week One: Erotica is Everywhere

We will define erotica and its purpose, including examples from literary fiction and erotic novels, including varying types of language and the mechanics of writing about sex, including research (no, you absolutely don’t have to have done the things you’re writing about). We’ll discuss language, voice, pace, and how to find the erotic potential in everyday situations, as well as how to overcome internal hurdles to writing erotica and answer your friends’ and families’ nosy questions.

Assignment: Students will be asked to write a prompt-driven erotic scene with particular attention to fresh imagery and avoidance of cliche.

Week Two: From Humor to Heartache: Setting the Mood

Erotica is not necessarily about shiny happy people having the best orgasms of their lives on every page (though you will find plenty of happy people enjoying their sexuality). Erotica may or may not have a traditional happy ending (pun intended). We’ll examine why humor and heartache work in erotica and how they can be used to your best advantage to add to the tension and draw of a story.

Assignment: Students will respond to story prompts incorporating humor and heartache respectively using the same set of characters.

Week Three: Motivation

Why is erotica about more than just a sex scene? How can you enhance the sex scenes in your stories by adding conflict, backstory and motivation? How does writing about characters fundamentally different from you push you to explore the genre, and what does it teach you about sexuality? We’ll explore different motivations within erotica and how they fuel the story.

Assignment: Students will explore point of view and voice in erotica by telling the same story from multiple viewpoints, and examining which voice speaks the most strongly.

Week Four: The Business of Erotica and Submitting Your Work

What are editors looking for in today’s erotica marketplace, and how can you stand out? Should you use a pseudonym? How can you extend your work beyond a single story? How much money can you expect to make from writing erotica?

Assignment: Complete a short story and submit it to a current market.

Goals Of This Class

  • Learn what erotica is (and isn’t)—and about the marketplace for erotica and erotic fiction
  • Write from various points of view, sexualities, and character types
  • Incorporate elements of pop culture, news, and everyday life into your erotica
  • Craft a complete erotic short story and submit it

 

Press Release-January 17-The Erotic Literary Salon-The Adult Sex-Ed Salon

Philadelphia’s Erotic Literary Salon-Live and the Adult Sex-Ed Salon, along with Attendee Readers, Share an Evening of Edutainment, Tuesday, Jan 17.

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Tuesday, January 3, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

PCSalons@gmail.com – contact: Susana Mayer, Ph.D., Salonnière,

PCSalons@gmail.comreserve a time slot to read at Salon (5 min max)

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com – guidelines for reading.

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com – blog: events, Salon notices, erotica, and guidelines.

 

The Erotic Literary Salon will be held Tuesday, January 17. The evening will start with the Adult Sex-Ed Salon a one-hour program devoted to sex and sexuality. The audience will create this month’s theme. They will have the opportunity to pose any questions regarding sex and sexuality anonymously. Sexologist Susana Mayer, PhD, along with co-host Walter will facilitate the Adult Sex-Ed Salon and attendees interested in sharing their knowledge and experiences will join in the discussion.

 

PHILADELPHIA: The Erotic Literary Salon, unique in the English-speaking world has launched a growing movement mainstreaming erotica. Salons attract a supportive audience of 65 or more individuals. Approximately 15 attendees participate as writers, readers, storytellers, spoken word performers of original works/words of others, the rest just come to listen, enjoy and applaud.

 

Salons gather the 3rd Tuesday of every month at TIME (The Bohemian Absinthe Lounge), 1315 Sansom Street, Center City, Philadelphia. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., for cocktails, food and conversation. Adult Sex-Ed between 7:00-8:00, readings begin at 8:30. Admission is $12, discounted for students and seniors to $10. Salon attendees must be 21.

 

Creator of this event, Dr. Susana, is Philadelphia’s best-known sexologist. She lends her voice to the Salon by offering relevant information to support the discussions that arise in the Salon and blog.

…surprisingly comfortable….Salon devotees praise her for the space she has created….”

“I think Susana is doing a very brave thing.”

Philadelphia Inquirer, February 10, 2010

 

“There are laughter and tears along with the hot rush of blood – to the face.

Daily News, March 15, 2010

 

“I never knew such a life of honesty could exist. I finally found a home I can be comfortable in…this event changed my life.

First-time attendee and reader 2013

 

 

AN 18TH CENTURY GUIDE TO SEX POSITIONS “The Joy of Sex for Renaissance Times”

Enjoy the view!

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Cornelis Bos after Michelangelo, drawing, Leda and the Swan
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I Modi or The Ways was a book of engravings depicting sixteen sexual positions. Think of it as The Joy of Sex for Renaissance times. The book, also known as The Sixteen Pleasures, was published by the engraver Marcantonio Raimondi in 1524. Raimondi based his explicit illustrations on a series of erotic privately owned paintings by Giulio Romano. The book was widely circulated. It led to the first prosecution for pornography by the Catholic church. Raimondi was imprisoned by Pope Clement VII. All copies of the book were destroyed.Our story doesn’t end there, as the poet and satirist Pietro Aretino heard of the book and wished to see Romano’s original paintings. Interestingly, Romano was not prosecuted by the Pope as his paintings (unlike Raimondi’s book) were not meant for public consumption. Aretino decided to write a series of erotic sonnets to accompany the paintings. He also successfully campaigned to have Raimondi released from prison.

In 1527, a second edition of I Modi was published with Aretino’s sonnets. Once again the Pope banned the book and all copies were destroyed—only a few small fragments of I Modi or Aretino’s Postures survive which are held at the British Museum.

In 1798 a completely new version of I Modi was published in France under the title L’Arétin d’Augustin Carrache ou Recueil de Postures Érotiques, d’Après les Gravures à l’Eau-Forte par cet Artiste Célèbre, Avec le Texte Explicatif des Sujets (The ‘Aretino’ of Agostino Carracci, or a collection of erotic poses, after Carracci’s engravings, by this famous artist, with the explicit texts on the subject) based on engravings by Baroque painter Agostini Carracci was published.

These 18th century engravings mixed classical myth and history within a contemporary setting—though their intention is still the same—to arouse and “educate” users to the joys of sex.

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The frontispiece to the book the goddess of love, sex, beauty and fertility Venusdescending on a chariot.

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Husband and wife Paris and Oenone try out penetration side-by-side.

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Angelique and Medor—two characters from the opera ‘Roland’—perform the ‘reverse cowgirl,’ although they probably had a different name for it back then.

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The Satyr and the Nymph demonstrating the missionary position.

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Julia with some athlete and the reverse cowgirl.

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Hercules using his strength to support Deianira in a standing missionary position.

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Mars and Venus—cowgirl, woman on top.

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The Cult of Priapus: two satyrs perform more missionary positions.

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Antony and Cleopatra and the ‘side-by-side missionary.’

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Bacchus and Ariadne go for the doggy style ‘wheelbarrow.’

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More vanilla from Polyenos and Chryseis.

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Mr. and Mrs. Satyr going for the full frontal missionary position.

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Jupiter and Juno the standing, kneeling missionary.

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The Roman Emperor Claudius’ wife Messalina being pleasured in a brothel.

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Achilles finding a new weak spot with Briseis.

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More missionary from ‘The Art of Love’ poet Ovid and ‘Corinna.’ 

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Queen of Carthage Dido being finger-banged by the mythical Aeneas.

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Variation on a theme: Statesman Alcibiades and girlfriend Glycera and the missionary position.

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http://dangerousminds.net/comments/an_18th_century_guide_to_sex_positions

 

Reminder-Next Tuesday-Nov 15-The Erotic Literary Salon-Live&Adult Sex-Ed

Tuesday you will be given the opportunity to talk sex & sexuality – ask questions, discuss and enjoy meeting people who are comfortable or at least interested in getting comfortable with sexuality.

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http://www.antiques.com/classified/Asian-Antiques/Asian-Decorative-Arts/Antique-Erotica-Signed-Carved-Ivory-3-Figures-X-Rated-

I would like to leave politics at the door, I’m overwhelmed with the election, results and our future as a nation. I need to forget for one evening that there is life outside the bubble of the Erotic Literary Salon.

Dhami Boo a summer regular reader at the Salon (reading to the sounds of his wonderful handmade instruments) reposted the following on fb.

IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THIS: posted by Clyde M. Hall: THINGS A PRESIDENT CANNOT DO:

Reverse any Supreme Court decision
This includes Obergefell v. Hodges, which made same-sex marriage a constitutional right; Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, which reaffirmed a woman’s right to choose first articulated in Roe v. Wade, another Supreme Court case. Grutter v. Bollinger, which instituted affirmative action, the entire body of Civil Rights case law, plus anything related to due process, including the right of minors to due process, your right to an attorney, Miranda rights, inadmissible evidence, etc.
(Even if Trump appoints the worst possible SC nominee, they still can’t reverse any of these decisions without a really significant case coming before the Court with new facts, and then they have to write an opinion stating how this case is different than that other case…it’s unlikely to happen.)
Write law or repeal any existing law
While traditionally, presidents have exerted influence on the legislative agenda (see, Obama’s role in advancing and promoting the Affordable Care Act) they cannot actually write or pass legislation. Bills, joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and simple resolutions must be introduced in the House by a Representative.
Presidents cannot strike down law. Only Congress can repeal laws, and only the Supreme Court can strike them down as unconstitutional.
Presidential influence is just that—influence.
(And if—for example—you are hated by 95% of the party you joined last week, and burned all your goddamn bridges by insulting them at various points in your campaign…..they’re unlikely to partner with you in crafting legislation.)
Make any law or declaration that infringes in any way on the rights of the states
So in the US, most of the rights are reserved to the states. You name it, it’s a state-run power. Criminal procedure and law? States. Medicare and Medicaid? States. The definition of marriage? States. Insurance, health departments, housing, unemployment benefits, public education, all these are state programs. And the president cannot infringe on those powers given to the states.
(This is why down-ticket voting is so important, because Mike Pence as governor of Indiana had 800x the power he’s going to have as VP.)
Declare war.
This one is the most complicated, because with the advent of our “conflicts” in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, etc. there has been a significant shift in the articulation of the war doctrine, and it is one of the least restricted of the president’s “restricted” powers. But, despite all that, a president still has no power to declare war.
Unilaterally appoint heads of administrative departments
Unilaterally make treaties with foreign nations
Essentially, while presidents have a lot of power, it’s mostly unofficial—they can’t make sweeping laws, they can’t overturn existing rights, the most they can do is refuse to enforce them (which is absolutely a threat! and a problem!) but we aren’t electing de facto royalty here.