Tag: erotica

Reminder-This Tuesday-Aug 21-The Erotic Literary Salon / Adult Sex-Ed, Why Ancient Greek Sculptures Have Small Penises

Article on penis size-below.

Once again at TIME location-1315 Sansom St. Philadelphia, they have recovered from the watermain break.

Featured featured reader I.J. Miller reading from his Wuthering Nights explicit version of Wuthering Heights.

 

“They (the Ancient Greeks) used the penis as an index of character”

I found the following article most interesting, since present day thoughts on penises are the bigger the better. In Ancient Greece quite the opposite.

Why Ancient Greek Sculptures Have Small Penises

By: Alexxa Gotthardt

The ancient Greeks famously fetishized the male body in sculptures that represent powerful, illustrious men as hulking figures with taut, rippling muscles. Sometimes these figures appear partially clothed in drapery or cloth; often, they are stark naked.

To the contemporary eye, their bodies are ideal—except for one, ahem, seminal detail. “They have small to very small penises, compared to the average of humanity,” art historian Andrew Lear, a specialist in ancient

and sexuality, says. “And they’re usually flaccid.”

Countless contemporary art lovers and historians have been struck by the modest nature of the phalluses that feature in classical sculptures of gods, emperors, and other elite men—from Zeus to celebrated athletes. The small members seem at odds with the massive bodies and mythically large personalities they accompany. But the ancient Greeks had their reasons for this aesthetic choice.
Rewind to the ancient Greek world of around 400 BC, and you’ll find that large, erect penises were not considered desirable, nor were they a sign of power or strength. In his play The Clouds (c. 419–423 BC), ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes summed up the ideal traits of his male peers as “a gleaming chest, bright skin, broad shoulders, tiny tongue, strong buttocks, and a little prick.”
Historian Paul Chrystal has also conducted research into this ancient ideal. “The small penis was consonant with Greek ideals of male beauty,” he writes in his book In Bed with the Ancient Greeks (2016). “It was a badge of the highest culture and a paragon of civilization.”
In ancient Greek art, most of a great man’s features were represented as ample, firm, and shiny—so why weren’t these same aesthetic principles applied to the penis? As Lear and other historians suggest, part of the answer lies in how the phalluses of less admirable men were portrayed.
Lustful, depraved satyrs, in particular, were rendered with very large, erect genitals, sometimes almost as tall as their torsos. According to mythology, these creatures were part-man, part-animal, and totally lacked restraint—a quality reviled by Greek high society. “Big penises were vulgar and outside the cultural norm, something sported by the barbarians of the world,” writes Chrystal. Indeed, across many an amphora pot and frieze, well-endowed satyrs can be seen drinking and pleasuring themselves with abandon.
In Greek comedy, fools also routinely sported large genitals—“the sign of stupidity, more of a beast than a man,” according to Chrystal. So, too, did artistic representations of the Egyptians, says Lear, who were long-time enemies of the Greeks.
In this way, satyrs, fools, and foes served as foils to male gods and heroes, who were honored for their self-control and intelligence (along with other qualities requiring restraint, like loyalty and prudence). If large phalluses represented gluttonous appetites, then “the conclusion can be drawn that the small, flaccid penis represented self-control,” explains Lear.
While today, being well-endowed is often equated with power and even sound leadership, “the penis was never a badge or virility or manliness in ancient Greece as it was in other cultures,” Chrystal writes. “Potency came from the intellect needed to power man’s responsibility to father children, prolong the family line and the oikos [the family unit or household], and sustain the polis [the city-state].”
There is no doubt that across ancient Greek art, the representation of the phallus—and its varying size—was symbolic. As Lear suggests, this might hint at why artists of the age depicted male nudes so often, even when a character or narrative might not require it. “They used the penis as an index of character,” explains Lear. “It said something.”
Back then, it indicated whether or not a man was upstanding. But while the cultural symbolism of the penis has since shifted, some things haven’t changed. Then, as now, the male sex was seen to be the distillation of a man’s ability to dominate.

Press Release-July 17-The Erotic Literary Salon/Adult Sex-Ed

Philadelphia’s Erotic Literary Salon-Live and the Adult Sex-Ed Salon, Featured Reader Flenardo Will Deliver His Eargasms.Tuesday, July 17.

 

PCSalons@gmail.com- contact: Susana Mayer, Ph.D., Salonnière,

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com– guidelines for reading.

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com– blog: events, Salon notices, erotica, and guidelines.

 

The Erotic Literary Salon will be held Tuesday, July 17.  The evening will start with the Adult Sex-Ed Salon a one-hour program devoted to sex and sexuality. The audience will have the opportunity to pose any questions regarding sex and sexuality anonymously.Sexologist Susana Mayer, PhD, along with co-host Walter will facilitate the Adult Sex-Ed Salon and attendees interested in sharing their knowledge and experiences will join in the discussion. This is always an extremely lively, audience driven Q & A period.

 

Featured reader Flenardo is a published Urban Fiction Author & Spoken Word Artist. He comes to deliver lyrical eargasmsby merging poetry and excerpts from his novels “The Poetic Whore” & “Married to the Pen.” His reading style and performance captivate listeners to a wet dimension of pure eroticism. Flenardo’s favorite quote is that “I write like a virgin but perform like a whore.” It means that a poet should remain humble when writing; but when hitting the stage give an experience of a lifetime.  Website: http://freknardo.com/

 

PHILADELPHIA: The Erotic Literary Salon, unique in the English-speaking world has launched a growing movement mainstreaming erotica. Salons attract a supportive audience of 60 or more individuals. Approximately 10-15 attendees participate as writers, readers, storytellers, spoken-word performers of original works. The audience has the opportunity to participate reading sexuality quotes from various books or they can just listen, enjoy and applaud. Sign-up to read at the door; guidelines can be found at the Salon’s website.

 

Salons gather the 3rd Tuesday of every month at TIME (The Bohemian Absinthe Lounge), 1315 Sansom Street, Center City, Philadelphia. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., for cocktails, food and conversation. Adult Sex-Ed between 7:00-8:00, readings begin at approximately8:30. Admission is $12, discounted for students and seniors to $10. Salon attendees must be 21.

 

Creator of this event, Dr. Susana, is Philadelphia’s best-known sexologist. She lends her voice to the Salon by offering relevant information to support the discussions that arise in the Salon and blog.

 

…surprisingly comfortable….Salon devotees praise her for the space she has created….”

“I think Susana is doing a very brave thing.”

Philadelphia Inquirer, February 10, 2010

 

“There are laughter and tears along with the hot rush of blood – to the face.

Daily News, March 15, 2010

 

“I never knew such a life of honesty could exist. I finally found a home I can be comfortable in…this event changed my life.

First-time attendee and reader 2013

 

 

Reminder-Tuesday, June 19th-The Erotic Literary Salon-Live, “Reading the Bible with Sex-Positive Eyes” – webinar with Reverend Dr. Bev Dale

Lola LePaon will be the featured reader this Tuesday, not to be missed. A choose your own adventure style erotic book reading.

Press Release for –

Pastor Challenges 2000 Years of Christian Anxiety about Sex

Christians Can Be Both Faithful and Sexual

 

Philadelphia, PA, June 5, 2018 – The Incarnation Institute for Sex & Faith (IISF) announces the release of a webinar series that will teach people how to live a sex-positive Christianity. Entitled “Reading the Bible with Sex-Positive Eyes,” this webinar series is the work of Reverend Dr. Beverly Dale, a Disciples of Christ pastor.

 

“The Christian church’s teachings that have fueled the purity culture, which prizes virginity before marriage, have been destructive for women and sexual minorities who have been captured in its guilt, fear and shame.” said Rev. Dr. Dale, a professor at Lancaster Theological Seminary. “This has got to change.”

 

The four-part webinar series includes the topics: “Introduction to Christian Sex Negativity: The Beginnings,” “Discerning Truth, Discerning Culture,” “Sex in the Bible: The Good, The Bad & the Ugly,” and “Sex: Whether, When, and How.” The webinars can be accessed through the websitehttp://www.incarnationinstitute.org.

Dale’s work is science-based and theologically grounded in scripture. Dr. Beverly Whipple, a researcher who helped to identify the G-spot and female ejaculation, is on Dale’s Advisory Team. Whipple said of her work on its behalf: “I am honored to be an advisor for this organization as a way to encourage the faith community to be involved in positive sexual health.” Another Advisor is Dr. Virginia Mollenkott, a Christian theologian whose focus corrects the trans and homophobia within Christendom has sought to empower the sexual minority communities. She calls the work of the Incarnation Institute for Sex & Faith an “imaginative and gifted ministry”!

About the Incarnation Institute for Sex & Faith (IISF)

 

The IISF provides training for professionals in the fields of theology and sexuality and offers resources and presentations for the general public that focus on inclusivity and science while also being grounded in traditional Christianity and biblical scholarship.

 

About Rev. Dr. Beverly Dale

 

The Founder and Chair of the Incarnation Institute for Sex & Faith (IISF), Dr. Dale served as a campus minister for over two decades at an Ivy League university, where she saw firsthand the damage of the hook-up and sexual ignorance and the impact of the purity culture. Her book “Advancing the Sexual Health of the Christian Client” co-authored with sex therapist Rachel Keller, will be published by Routledge Publishing in 2019.

 

Contact:

 

Beverly Dale

Incarnation Institute for Sex & Faith

215-668-7802

revbev@IncarnationInstitute.org

http://www.incarnationinstitute.org

Press Release-June 19-The Erotic Literary Salon/Adult Sex-Ed-Featured Reader Lola LePaon

Philadelphia’s Erotic Literary Salon-Live and the Adult Sex-Ed Salon, Featured Reader Lola LePaon Reading From Her New Book “Flick,”Tuesday, June 19.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 PCSalons@gmail.com- contact: Susana Mayer, Ph.D., Salonnière,

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com– guidelines for reading.

www.theEroticliterarysalon.com– blog: events, Salon notices, erotica, and guidelines.

The Erotic Literary Salon will be held Tuesday, June 19.  The evening will start with the Adult Sex-Ed Salon a one-hour program devoted to sex and sexuality. The audience will have the opportunity to pose any questions regarding sex and sexuality anonymously.Sexologist Susana Mayer, PhD, along with co-host Walter will facilitate the Adult Sex-Ed Salon and attendees interested in sharing their knowledge and experiences will join in the discussion. This is always an extremely lively, audience driven Q & A period.

Featured reader Lola LePaon is a published erotica author. She will read the first story in her recently released book, “Flick,” based on the split decision moment when you decide to refrain or give in to something definitively; whether it is cheating, or revenge, or experimentation. Each story builds up to a decision, and the reader selects the direction. The word “flick” by definition means a sudden movement or to propel as such. In this instance the reader is propelled into fantasy. “Flick” is erotica framed as a choose your own adventure story. Instagram: @FLICK_by_Lola; Twitter: @Author_Lola

YouTube: YouTube.com/LolaLePaon; Facebook: Facebook.com/LolaLePaonFans

PHILADELPHIA: The Erotic Literary Salon, unique in the English-speaking world has launched a growing movement mainstreaming erotica. Salons attract a supportive audience of 60 or more individuals. Approximately 10-15 attendees participate as writers, readers, storytellers, spoken-word performers of original works. The audience has the opportunity to participate reading sexuality quotes from various books or they can just listen, enjoy and applaud. Sign-up to read at the door; guidelines can be found at the Salon’s website.

Salons gather the 3rd Tuesday of every month at TIME (The Bohemian Absinthe Lounge), 1315 Sansom Street, Center City, Philadelphia. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., for cocktails, food and conversation. Adult Sex-Ed between 7:00-8:00, readings begin at approximately8:30. Admission is $12, discounted for students and seniors to $10. Salon attendees must be 21.

Creator of this event, Dr. Susana, is Philadelphia’s best-known sexologist. She lends her voice to the Salon by offering relevant information to support the discussions that arise in the Salon and blog.

…surprisingly comfortable….Salon devotees praise her for the space she has created….”

“I think Susana is doing a very brave thing.”

Philadelphia Inquirer, February 10, 2010

“There are laughter and tears along with the hot rush of blood – to the face.

Daily News, March 15, 2010 

“I never knew such a life of honesty could exist. I finally found a home I can be comfortable in…this event changed my life.

First-time attendee and reader 2013