Tag: aphrodisiac

Flibanserin-Pink Viagra in a Fungus Scent?

The resounding answer is yes, and the Stinkhorn fungus is even shaped like a phallus. I don’t recall reading about this study in 2001, but since the recent FDA approval of drug for female sexual desire has received so much attention someone has done their homework. It went viral and Dvora a regular at the Salon posted on fb.

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CAN AN ORGASM BE CAUSED BY THE SCENT OF A MUSHROOM? – THE STINKHORN MUSHROOM

Susana Mayer’s “The PULSE” Interview – Aphrodisiacs can spark sexual imagination, but probably not libido

You can listen to my interview along with others on the PULSE radio show on Love and Lust. It can be heard again, tomorrow, Sunday June 14th at 10AM on 90.9FM or via the link below. My segment is the last 10 minutes.

http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local/the-pulse/82765-science-of-aphrodisiacs 

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Reminder – this Tuesday, June 16th, the Erotic Literary Salon-Live.

 

 

Oysters-Aphrodisiac, Sex Toy Machine-Convenient Aide

Merilyn Jackson, a frequent reader at the Salon recently had her poem “Oysters” published in Cleaver Magazine. I recall her wonderful reading of this work at the Salon, her last line left me wanting.

OYSTERS
by Merilyn Jackson

I am licking
the insides
of the
oyster shells

embedded in salt
on a plate
black as your
angry eyes

like your love,
cooling rapidly as lava.

Forgive me.

OysterIt reminds me
of
how much
I want
to lick
your hair.

http://www.cleavermagazine.com/oysters-by-merilyn-jackson/

America’s Very First Sex Toy Vending Machine Is Coming To Philadelphia

BY  • 05.27.15

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Philadelphia-based entrepreneurs Vaughn Sandman and Dean Kitagawa have created what they’re calling North America’s first-of-its-kind sex toy vending machine, PinkBox, because we live in a magical age. Sandman and Kitagawa are holding a launch party at Philadelphia’s Underground Arts venue on Thursday night to celebrate this milestone, and let people try out the machine firsthand.

The creators say that “sex is nothing to be embarrassed about,” and being able to obtain dildos conveniently out of a vending machine does cut down on the awkwardness of the face-to-face interaction of going to an actual sex shop, or having to wait for a delivery when that itch just won’t scratch itself.

Philly Mag spoke with the PinkBox team about their new creation:

[Host of Sex with Timaree Podcast!] Dr. Timaree, who’s serving as PinkBox’s “resident sexpert” and curator of what’s inside, explains that the machine stocks “everything from condoms and cock rings to Lelo vibrators. There are glass dildos, and starter restraint kits.”

Dr. Timaree can’t yet confirm where the first machines will be placed, but Sandman and Kitagawa say they are “very adamant about making sure we get a PinkBox in the Gayborhood that caters more specifically to the boys.”

The creators also say that, due to the low overhead, they’re able to keep their prices competitive for those who appreciate value in their sex toys as much as convenience. It’s probably only a matter of time before these things can be found in every nightclub and strip joint across the country.

http://uproxx.com/webculture/2015/05/americas-very-first-sex-toy-vending-machine-is-coming-to-philadelphia/

When Lettuce Was a Sacred Sex Symbol

Ancient Egypt, approximately 2,000 B.C. lettuce was considered an aphrodisiac. A Phallic symbol that represented the celebrated food of the Egyptian god of fertility. It was also used as a remedy for hair gowth.

Excerpts from article:

Lettuce has been harvested for millenia—it was depicted by ancient Egyptians on the walls of tombs dating back to at least 2,700 B.C. The earliest version of the greens resembled two modern lettuces: romaine, from the French word “romaine” (from Rome), and cos lettuce, believed to have been found on the island of Kos, located along the coast of modern day Turkey.

But in Ancient Egypt around 2,000 B.C., lettuce was not a popular appetizer, it was an aphrodisiac, a phallic symbol that represented the celebrated food of the Egyptian god of fertility, Min. (It is unclear whether the lettuce’s development in Egypt predates its appearance on the island of Kos.) The god, often pictured with an erect penis in wall paintings and reliefs was also known as the “great of love” as he is called in a text from Edfu Temple. The plant was believed to help the god “perform the sexual act untiringly.”

Salima Ikram, Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo who specializes in Ancient Egyptian food explains Min’s part in lettuce history. “Over 3,000 years, [Min’s] role did change, but he was constantly associated with lettuce,” she says.

The first of these depictions appeared around 1970-80 B.C. in the The White Chapel of Senusret I, though there may be earlier examples, Ikram says.

This relief, from the funerary temple of Ramses III at Medinet Habu, for example, depicts Min’s harvest festival. At the center is a statue of Min. Behind him, a procession of priests holds a small garden of lettuce. Min is also sometimes depicted wearing a long, red ribbon around his forehead that some say represents sexual energy.

“One of the reasons why [the Egyptians] associated the lettuce with Min was because it grows straight and tall—an obvious phallic symbol,” Ikram says. “But if you broke off a leaf it oozed a sort of white-ish, milky substance—basically it looked like semen.”

When the butt of modern Romaine lettuce is cut off, a similar substance oozes from the plant and gives it a bitter flavor. Lettuce’s scientific classification lactuca sativa, is derived from the Latin word for milk and shares the same root as lactose, the sugar enzyme found in dairy products. (Ed. — corrected thanks to feedback from reader joelfinkle) (While we’re talking etymology, raw lettuce dishes known as herba salata (“salted greens”) gave rise to the English word “salad.”) Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book provides further options for what the lettuce milk of the “ithyphallic god of increase” may represent:

Lettuce was sacred to him because of the “straight vertical surge” of their growth, milky juice they exude which could be taken as a symbol of mothers milk or semen.

Ancient Egyptians used the lettuce differently than those who would come later. The leaves had a greenish blue color and were often removed from the plant due to their bitter taste. Instead of being part of a meal, the seeds from the bud of the flowers were harvested and pressed for their natural oils which were used for cooking, medication—even mummification. Lettuce oil was a standard in the Egyptian materia medica and even today is used as a traditional remedy for hair regrowth.

Read more:

http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/food/2013/07/when-lettuce-was-a-sacred-sex-symbol/?utm_source=smithsoniantopic&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130721-Weekender